Delicatessen By: Jean-Pierre Jeunet & Marc Caro

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2 responses to “Delicatessen By: Jean-Pierre Jeunet & Marc Caro

  1. j.j.iuorno-paladino

    yessssssssss…
    in total agreement…thank you for your rich commentaries…
    thank you for your completely personal view of this FANtasTiC film…
    my question is; what impressions remain, what images keep on percolating in our minds when we recall the film?…what do i feel ?…

    the creation of the cinematiki has been a transformative experience for me…
    previously, .i’ve discussed films with my friends and family BUT never before i’ve had the weekly continuity of having commentaries and discussion with 40 different points of view at once…
    tom and i wanted to satisfy our own personal needs of re-viewing some/all of our favorite films and i’ve learned so much from all of you…
    marc caro was one of the T…
    the one that…

  2. Barry Sultanoff

    After viewing “Delicatessen,” I could hardly speak. The experience had for me been holy, like being in a shimmering sanctuary with jeweled windows and Spirit’s light streaking in, with me (all of us?)sitting in deep meditation (and also getting to eat popcorn: see..I CAN have it all! :-). Any words from me after the film concluded on such a sublime note (if you’ll pardon the musical pun) could only have diminished it. I came around, though, and had much to say..so much that I had to hold my tongue so as to make room for others. And I DO love listening to all of your comments, my fellow (and gal) film-time-travelers. Like Tom, Jeunet and Caro are now heroes for me (BTW, my first 10-speed bicycle, that I bought right out of the window in Boston in 1971, was a lime-green French-made Jeunet. I treasured it, one of my favorite “rides” of all time.. as was the “ride” of Delicatessen.) This film-art was pure genius. The discussion after was rich. I am still so intrigued that Lynn, who loved the clown scenes, as I did, did not view the Troglodites as clowns–nor did some others, apparently. For me, life is not divided into “clown” and “not clown” impressions (I see the clown in everyone, including all the farm animals I live with)–nor would I make that distinction with this film. Though not, of course, in white-face, the T’s were as droll as it gets; they were a rubbery-suited riot, through and through–PLUS they were committed vegetarians who lived “all for one and one for all,” unlike the other post-apocalyptic survivors. The directors’ loud comment on meat-eating was to me fully apparent. For me, in real life, I would as soon eat a chicken (frog, snail, etc.) as I would eat my mother. And I don’t believe that I would turn to meat-eating, even if my survival depended upon it. In the film, it was OK to eat someone’s mother (some old lady) to satisfy an ingrained (kind of a “corny” pun here, I suppose, but unintentional) taste for flesh. (And OK, maybe you think they HAD to eat meat to survive.. but I don’t!) This film was a work of art of the highest order. The 3 recent Jeunet films we have viewed are among the greatest films ever made. I so look forward to seeing “MicMac” (? spelling). Thanks to Tom an JJ and to you all… !!! See you next week at the movies.

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