Forum

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How would you improve our CinemaTiki experience ?

20 responses to “Forum

  1. Yo, JJ ! Long time no see / hear ! The best film : La Notte di San Lorenzo by the Taviani brothers. Let me know how you’re doing up there, cheers, James de Booij

    • Federico Fellini, born in Rimini, Italy (1920). When he was 12, he joined a traveling circus, and when he was 19, he joined a vaudeville troupe and traveled all over Italy with them. He became known as the “company poet,” but he was also a good sketch writer, bit player, and scenery painter. Circuses and vaudeville often turn up in Fellini’s films, appearing in La Strada (1954), La Dolce Vita (1960), and The Clowns (1971).

      He claimed all art was autobiographical, and said, “If I set out to make a film about a fillet of sole, it would be about me.”

      • January 20th. it’s the birthday of Italian film director Federico Fellini, born in Rimini, Italy (1920). As a young man, he enrolled in the University of Rome Law School to avoid military service, but he never attended classes. He worked instead as a cartoonist for a satirical magazine and as a gag writer for a vaudeville troupe. In 1943, he was ordered to undergo a medical examination for the army, but his medical records were destroyed in a bombing. He spent the next two years in the slums of Rome eluding the German Occupation troops, who searched the city for men to replenish the armed forces and to work in slave labor camps. After the war, Fellini turned to filmmaking and made a string of films about beggars, gypsies, swindlers, and prostitutes. He became famous for his film La Dolce Vita (1960). He was a charming man, who always wore a wide-brimmed black hat and gestured with both hands, even while driving one of his favorite motorcars. He overdubbed all his actors’ voices because he believed that most people didn’t have voices that matched their appearance. He said, “All art is autobiographical; the pearl is the oyster’s autobiography.”

    • sorry i missed “alphie” (1966) last week. interestingly, the 2004 version of “alphie” stars jude law, who also played the younger man in “sleuth” (2007) opposite michael caine as the older man, who himself (michael caine) played the younger man opposite laurence olivier in the 1972 version of sleuth.
      caine observed of their respective portrayals of andrew wyke: “larry played the character as a very dangerous eccentric [whereas] i am a murderous psychotic.” i really enjoyed watching both sleuths, which were hugely different from each other; and i look forward to comparing the alphies also.

    • “A film is never really good unless the camera is an eye in the head of a poet.”
      Orson Welles

  2. The Devils gives us an opportunity to glimpse a period of history most of us know little or anything about. The film challenges our sense of good and evil. Like The Crucible or a Tale of Two Cities it delves into the mob mentality. When the mentality is tinged with religiosity it can be a fatal cocktail. It explores decadence, debauchery, mysticism, insanity, the plague, religious pograms, the role of women in society, hysteria and true love.

    LIke the officials in The Crucible or the people’s court in the Tale of Two Cities, the law is often corrupt and murderous. Other examples of mob injustice are the McCarthy Hearings. It’s important for us to know what the mob is capable of and how easily it can be manipulated and perverted.

    Film isn’t just for entertainment, but also it can enlighten. The Devils is an example of that enlightenment.

  3. The intention of the Cinematiki is to present you with an opportunity to view some of the best, most creative, most controversial, most banned films… Ken Russell’s ” The Devils” is NOT an easy to like film…
    Ken Russell is NOT an easy to like film maker…
    Ken Russell, just like YOU or me is not easy to understand…
    he was an artist that dared to express himself in his times in ways that were iconoclastic, irreverent and “dangerous” to the establish norm…
    regardless of what we ALL think within the limitations of our prejudices and ignorance Ken Russell is and always will be,a worthy resident of the Film Pantheon in which Kubrick, Altman, Welles, Anderson and Schlesinger’s dwell sipping good Clarets or Pinot Noirs and smoking good Havana cigars and Maui Wowee pakalolo…
    hopefully you allow yourself to grow wider and wilder…

    • J.J. — Well expressed, my silver tongued brother! I very much agree with what you said, and would add to that list: Tarantino, the Coens, Scorsese, Kaufman, DePalma… and more.
      That said, we all have our predilections and preferences — and I REALLY did not care for “The Devils”. Perhaps a better copy and the restored footage would help. Let me know, I definitely won’t be re-viewing it! 🙂

  4. Happy 3rd anniversary and Happy Birthday JJ! Great night with Wanda the Fish. Hereʻs the night from my point of view:

    all good things!
    with warmest aloha~
    Richard

  5. Feeling Fellini…

    there are so many fantasy worlds and planets in which Federico dwelled, lived, thrived and kept on expanding on his consciousness…

    he loved the mystery of the circus, with their clowns, freaks, special acts and the merry-go-round music that hypnotized the child’s mind…

    nino rota was his musical collaborator setting the mood with the music that pulled the strings of the heart at all times and made even the most melodramatic scenes a little more real…

    fellini loved and embraced the theatre people, the odd and the eccentric, the have beens, the never beens, the freaks, the naive, the innocents, the con-artists and their prey…

    he was deeply immersed in the reality of survival in post-war italy…

    and he kept on cross-pollinating our minds with his imagery…

    federico was a poet that just kept on filming and recording his emotions about the downtrodden, the defiant, the survivors and ALL the displaced hordes from the deep south of italy…

    he was chronicler of the post war times in Rome…

    documenting the immense cast of characters that populated Rome at that time …

    from the fringes near ostia, a seaside town many kilometers away from rome, to the sophisticated world of via veneto with their aristocracy, jet-set nouveau tourists and all the banality of the ultra-rich that had their villas on Via Appia Antica, to the survivors living in caves in the middle of the fields to the excess of the liturgical crowds that adored plaster saints and martyrs…

    Fellini also loved the ocean, the rivers, the brooks, the bodies of water in which people bathed, drowned, were saved, dissapeared and were baptipsed into some new faith…

    in all his films the fixations of childhood and puberty were re-visited by the child-like adult that kept on expanding his mind on fantastic settings, dark espresso, a little tobacco, a whiff of women’s breasts and the joy of creating…

    and he was not afraid to dream and explore the history, myths and dark corners of the human soul and believe in the redeeming power of the magical…

  6. thoughts on september 11

  7. Queridos Cinematikeros:
    This film was “lost” for many years. It was the first 35mm film ever that has come to light. It was taken by camera mounted on the front of a cable car as it`s traveling down the street. You feel as if you’re really there, standing at the front looking down the street, amazing piece of historic film. The number of automobiles is staggering for 1906. Absolutely amazing! The clock tower at the end of Market Street at the Embarcadero wharf is still there.
    How many “street cleaning” people were employed to pick up after the horses? Talk about going green!
    This film, originally thought to be from 1905 until David Kiehn with the Niles Essanay Silent Film Museum figured out exactly when it was shot. From New York trade papers announcing the film showing to the wet streets from recent heavy rainfall and shadows indicating time of year and actual weather and conditions on historical record, even when the cars were registered (he even knows who owned them and when the plates were issued!) It was filmed only four days before the Great California Earthquake of April 18th 1906 and shipped by train to NY for processing. Amazing, but true! No wonder there had to be laws created to regulate driving habits.
    This is a fascinating movie. A camera on the front of a street car 105 years ago. Look at the hats the ladies were wearing and the long dresses. Some of the cars had the steering wheels on the right side, I wonder when they standardized on the left? Sure was still a lot of horse drawn vehicles in use. Mass transit looked like the way to get around. Looks like everybody had the right of way.
    Once you view it check out the other film from the same street filmed in 2005.Perhaps the oldest “home movie” that you will ever see!
    Please go this site: http://www.youtube.comwatch_popup?v=NINOxRxze9k

  8. Splendide journée à tous les lecteurs de ce forum de discussions ,

    Pour commencer , offrez-moi l’opportunitĂ© de vous dĂ©montrer ma gratitude pour chacune des excellentes connaissances que j’ai dĂ©couvertes sur cet beau forum .

    Je ne suis pas convaincue d’ĂŞtre au meilleur section mais je n’en ai pas trouvĂ© de meilleure .

    Je proviens de Plumas, ca . J’ai 30 annĂ©es et j’Ă©duque 6 agrĂ©ables enfants qui sont tous âgĂ©s entre six et 16 annĂ©es (1 est adoptĂ©e ). J’aime beaucoup beaucoup les animaux et j’essaie de leur offrir les accessoires pour animaux qui leur rendent la vie plus heureuse .

    Je vous remercie d’avance pour toutes les superbes discussions qui viendront et je vous remercie surtout de votre compassion pour mon français moins que parfait: ma langue de naissance est le portuguais et je fais de mon mieux de m’enseigner mais c’est très complexe !

    Arrividerchi

    Arthru

  9. two years after i first saw “the secret of the grain” i was finally able to program it for this coming Monday March 21st, 2011 @ the cinematiki…
    hopefully after my second viewing with all of you i will still feel as pleasantly impressed with this film as at that time when i thought it was a cross-cultural jewel…
    your commentaries are always welcome , even those that SHOUT at us or call us names like God (s) or Instructor (s)…
    they are read and either filed in some back or front burner because they dovetail with our vision or …
    tom and i are so full of ideas about which/what films to play @ our cinematiki that it may take us decades before we even start to scratch the surface of what we have envisioned and planned from the beginning…
    we still have so many directors that we want to review from the past, including the inmediate past…
    we provide our community with a weekly cinematheque that shows the best of world cinema with the added value of having a salon where we discuss, analize, critizice and collectively learn about the art of cinema…
    attendance is by invitation/gratis and tom and i gladly share this knowledge, passion and commitment with all of you freely and with a deep sense of Aloha…

  10. Some very good commentaries on the politics and idiocy of the Oscars…

    check this out:
    http://www.nytimes.com/2011/02/27/movies/awardsseason/27oscars.html?_r=1&nl=todaysheadlines&emc

  11. I’m sure we all hope to see photos from the social event of the decade, the Cinematiki 100th film party held at our gracious hostess Dorothy’s home. Here in Forum would be a good place for all you “lense masters” to post your links to your photo upload sites.

    JJ has suggested posting photos on this site but I don’t see a way to do that. If there is a way, hopefully the site moderators will post instructions on how to do it.

  12. Here is an idea for a film “genre” that may not otherwise be considered – films from books by Pat Conroy.
    http://www.movierevie.ws/genres/1214/1/Books-to-Film-Pat-Conroy.html
    – Please comment if you know these films.

    I have seen all these films and in my opinion all are excellent. I became aware of Pat Conroy as a writer when living for a couple of years near the town of Beaufort South Carolina in the mid-70’s where Conroy had been a teacher in his early professional years. His books tend to be autobiographical in nature, and in some cases deal with the racism and ignorance of the culture in the South. Conroy became a major success as an author, then lived for awhile in a Pacific Heights (San Francisco) home in the ’90s while I was there (couldn’t afford his neighborhood, though).

    http://www.patconroy.com/about.php

  13. OK, I’ll respond myself. I think more appropriate to rate the films by industry standards than comparing only to ciNeMatiKi films. We don’t want no stinking one star films showing up here!

  14. The “rate the film” feature is a good one. I rated a few and then it occurred to me that maybe I should not be rating these in comparison with all films I’ve ever seen, but instead I should rate them compared to all ciNemaTiKi films I have seen. That would mean a great film might get only one or 2 stars from my rating.

    Wuddaya think , gang? Which would be more appropriate?

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